Build a Strong Interview Process

Sean Dailey, Ytel |  

An often overlooked aspect of talent acquisition is the actual interview process that candidates go through. We've entered an age where user experience reigns supreme. Yet, during the interview process, user experience takes a backseat to the overwhelming desire to find perfection. It makes sense; you want to make sure the candidate has the skills necessary, the thinking process required, the cultural fit you dream of, but your 15-step process could be scaring those candidates away!

Build a Strong Interview Process

An often overlooked aspect of talent acquisition is the actual interview process that candidates go through. We've entered an age where user experience reigns supreme. Yet, during the interview process, user experience takes a backseat to the overwhelming desire to find perfection. It makes sense; you want to make sure the candidate has the skills necessary, the thinking process required, the cultural fit you dream of, but your 15-step process could be scaring those candidates away!

Build a Strong Interview Process

In the interview process, the old adage “less is more” couldn’t be more true. After years of agency recruiting, the one thing I noticed that separated the successful companies from the rest was how they went about hiring. Here are some tips on how to avoid creating a wormhole interview process, in order to find the talent you need! 

It starts with the job description

It’s impossible to have a solid interview process if you don’t have candidates to interview. Truthfully, this could be the most crucial step in the entire process. In order to attract the talent you want, the job description must resonate with your ideal candidate. Maybe it’s a personality type you're looking for, or a creative skill. The verbiage you use means everything. Think of the job description as bait. You need to dress the hook to attract the fish you seek.


Don’t create roadblocks

As tempting as it is to start your interview process with a test, don’t do it! You’re asking someone to take time out of their day (often while working another job) to fill out a test. Not only are you asking that, but you are asking them to do this on blind faith that there will be a return on investment of their valuable time. Another roadblock may be in the skills you’re looking for. If you have a Christmas wish list of skills required, it’s time to get real. Identify the true must-haves, and consider the rest cherries on top.

Don’t beat them down with process

I am all for the idea of fully vetting a candidate, but that doesn’t mean having six interviews. Keep things simple! An initial phone call with your recruiter should be able to gauge the skill and cultural fit. Then they should pass it along to the hiring manager for a phone call. The hiring manager can go over the day to day tasks and truly dig deep into the skills you are looking for. After that, if all is well, bring the candidate on-site to meet the team. Giving them a chance to meet with everyone they'll work with makes the decision easier at the end of the process. 

Snooze, you loose

Don't be one of those companies who drag a process out for weeks or months. Talent is recognized, especially in the candidate-driven market we're in. A solid employee will not be on the market for weeks; realistically, you have a few days to make a decision. When you find that all-star, even if it’s the first candidate you've interviewed, don’t miss out on them because you “want to see a few more resumes”.

So there you have it! With these tips under your belt, we're confident your hiring process will become seamless and in line with the talent you want to acquire. Happy hiring! 

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About The Author

Sean Dailey, Ytel

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Sean leads the People, Culture, and Partnership efforts at Ytel. After almost 5 years of agency recruiting, Sean decided to move into an internal recruiting role, where he could have more of a direct effect on growth and people’s lives That’s when he met Ytel and the rest is history. Sean is a huge believer in culture, and puts an emphasis on people and building relationships.


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